Category Archives: news

Quicksilver Cup – Maui Race Series #4

Report by racer and US Windsurfing Regional Director Tammy Bockius

Photo by Harry Wiewel

Maui’s Kanaha beach park enjoyed perfect 20+ m.p.h.trade winds and blue skies this past weekend. The 4th event of the 2013 Maui Race Series, the Quiksilver Cup, was well attended with recreational and pro sailors, spectators and photographers.

On race day, I like to get to the beach early and rig every sail that I own.  The skipper’s meeting is always at 10 a.m., our fearless race director, Joe Boersma, goes over the rules and gives everyone a pep talk.  We are allowed to launch at 11 a.m. for a warm up, the first possible heat start is at 11:30.  It’s important to check out the wind direction and strength, sail the race course, see exactly where the buoys are placed, take a good look at the start line.  It also helps to choose the right size sail to race on, which I decided to do this time.

photo by Franck Berthout

All the Women racers, Argentina Jiminez Bonilla, Diane Sakamoto and Toshie Yamamoto, were hitting the start line on time.  My starts in the afternoon were good too, ‘text book’ you might say, if there was a book on correct slalom starts.  Argentina is very fast so I have to sail my best to catch her.  I had my timing down and eagle eyes lined up on that first inside buoy.  I am not the biggest or fastest sailor, but lucky for me, slalom racing is more than just sailing in a straight line, it is a ‘zig zag’.  Jibing technique is as important as pure board speed.   I won all 4 women’s heats on my  Maui Sails tr-9 5.1 and custom Carbon Art slalom board.  I love that board, seriously, I named her “Relentless”, I printed  it with a sharpie on the tail.  My bigger slalom board is named “Ruth” ( yes, it is biblical, short for “Ruthless”).   I had one very clean jibe at the first buoy,  just winged it out of there, a ‘dream jibe’ you might say.  The rest were somewhat ‘careful’ granny jibes but one of my personal racing rules is ‘whatever you do, do NOT fall in’.   If you are in the back of the pack, go for it, it’s ok to fall in then.  My 13 year old daughter, Sailor, was the youngest racer and only Jr. female, she knew to stand it up around the whole course.

The Men had some very competitive heats with several exciting races.   There were the usual local All Stars in attendance, Peter Slate, Micah Buzianis, Phil McGain, Dan Ellis, Kevin Ozee, Peter John, Mike Yasak, Neil Turpin, Ben Massenburg, Chris McNeil, Greg Thomas, Chris Freeman, Matt Daniels – there were also a few very fast visiting racers, Gunnar Asmussen and Marco Lang from Germany, Eric Lemire from France, the Holliday Brothers Jack and Luke from New Zealand.

It is always interesting to watch their starts, observe their racing tactics, see who comes out of that first buoy in front, note how much distance they can put between themselves and second.  The North team Boys were bringing it, the Hot Sails riders were sailing  well, the Maui Sails team took some titles, everyone was sailing their hardest.  Race day will bring out this extra something that YOU might not even know that you had. Training, focus and determination, there was a lot of that on display this past weekend.

photo by Jimmie Hepp

All the racers and their friends and families enjoyed the awards beach ceremony after racing.  Thank you to Hi-Tech and Quicksilver for sponsoring the event.   Also, thanks to Pollis Mexican restaurant and US Windsurfing for buying extra trophies again (there are 9 divisions, sometimes 10 or 11).  Also a BIG Mahalo to Pacific Millworks and the AWT for loaning us their beautiful custom built wood awards podium.

The first 4 MRS events will be calculated for the Maui County overall title awarded at the next event.  The 5th and last event, the Hawaii State championships, will be held July 27th.  The Maui Race Series is looking forward to next Summer, 2014, its’ 30th continuous year.  Make plans to come join us for some stellar racing here on Maui.  Sailors of all levels, ages, sizes and gender are encouraged to participate in the longest running Slalom series in the world.

Results can be found at https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://www.mauiraceseries.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Quiksilver-2013.xlsx&hl&chrome=true

 

Aloha from Maui, Tammy

Meanline Fins Slalom – Maui Race Series event #3

Reported by Peter Slate

Photo by Harry Wiewel Rider: Peter Slate

Meanline Fins, manufacturers of high performance fins, sponsored the third event of the 2013 Maui Race Series. The conditions were typically light for Maui, (7.8M and 7.0m sails) but, none the less, provided for some good racing. New at this event was a much longer reach, allowing for those with more board speed to have an advantage over those with better gybing skills.

Very nice to see  the competitors who travelled from Japan, Germany and Austria. As for the racing, the wind turned a little off-shore, making the start even more important, and hence, the jostling for position just that much more exciting !! Rounding the first buoy was just as exciting as always . With ALL the regular crash and burn that’s Racing !

The Mens Pro, Micah Buzianis was dominant, besides one race, with Dan Ellis and Gunnar Asmussen fighting it out for second. The Woman’s pro division well contested with, Fujiko Onishi wining ahead of fellow Japanese racer, Tomoya Hishikawa. Last weeks winner, Tamara Bockius, was third. Tammy’s husband, Sam Bockius raced very consistently to win the mens semi-pro division. A big shout out went to Deniz Bicakci, for winning the Juniors and Expert divisions. Congratulations, Deniz !

The next race is 13 July 2013, and we hope all the local racers who haven’t made it to an event will get their gear together for the next event.

Photo by Jimmie Hepp

Results can be found at https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://www.mauiraceseries.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Meanline-Fins-2013.xlsx&hl&chrome=true

 

Carbon Art Challenge – Maui Race Series Event #2

photo by Jimmie Hepp

Laurence Carey (NZL 252) brings us this report from the second event of the Maui Slalom Series, the Carbon Art Challenge.

Over the past three years I have been coming to Maui to compete in the ‘Maui Race Series’ so I can train and race against some of the best sailors in the world. The ‘Carbon Art Challenge’ (15th June) was a great event with over 30 sailors competing. The conditions were very challenging with breaking waves on the start line and gusts between 25-30knots in the afternoon.

The races started at 11.30 and the ability groups were first, I was competing in the Pro division. This was a very competitive fleet with 13 people racing in each heat from 6 different countries. This made starts crucial as if you didn’t get it right you would be last to the first mark. Over the day the waves got bigger with some big crashes in all divisions. In heat one of the Pro division, Peter Slate and I nailed the start and we were the first to the mark however, I slipped at the mark and wiped out but managed to still get 6th. Over the morning the wind picked up from 15knots to around 18-20knots making the racing much more interesting and the North Team dominated the Pro division. Peter Slate got the first two bullets and Dan Ellis got the next two bullets. Peter Slate won the pro division, with Dan Ellis 2nd, and Phil McGain 3rd. I came 6th overall.

photo by Jimmie Hepp

After the ability groups we had the age divisions where the races became more civilised as there was only 7-10 people in each heat. I was racing in the Open Mens (19-39) where I would be racing against Dan Ellis, Peter John and Neil Turpin from the Pro division. This was some great racing and I started off very well. I led the first race around most of the course however, on the second mark I hit the back of a wave and Dan Ellis overtook me on the inside. The remaining races were very close but Dan managed to win each heat in the age group. Peter John and I battled for 2nd as we both had the same points by the end of the day however, as I had a lower discard I got 2nd and Peter got 3rd.

This was my last event unfortunately for the summer as I am going to the 2013 IFCA worlds in Turkey – Alacati. The training I have had is invaluable and has provided me with the best preparation possible for the Worlds on July 1st – 6th. Although I wish I could do the rest of the races in Maui I will be carrying on with my university studies after the Worlds. I plan on doing a few PWA events in the near future and hopefully I will be able to come back and race next year in the race series. The next race day is on the 29th of June and is sponsored by ‘Meanline Fins’. This will be a very interesting event as the race format will be slightly different with the race legs being slightly longer and the final leg into the beach will run through the death triangle/weird wave.

Results can be found at https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://www.mauiraceseries.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Carbon-Art-2013.xlsx&hl&chrome=true

 

 

Maui Race Series: Da Kine Slalom Classic

submitted by Deniz Biacakci – winner of junior and expert divisions at the first event of the Maui Slalom Series

photo by Harry Wiewel

Saturday, June 1 kicked off the 29th annual Maui Race Series. The sun was shining, the water was warm, and the wind was a nice steady 20-25 mph. The day started at 11:30am with the age divisions racing in the morning . I raced in the Juniors along with my younger brother Connor McKenney and first-timer Sailor Bockius.

The first heat ran with only Connor and me which was nice so that I could wait for him after each buoy and make sure he wasn’t messing anything up. Sailor showed up for the second heat and blew only one jibe! Connor was able to beat her with his faster slalom board so she took 3rd. The third heat ran with only my brother and me. He made most of his jibes, but he still ended up in second.

Connor took first in the final heat! I was having him practice cutting me off on the final stretch between the last outside buoy and the finish line. When I cut upwind to pass him in the last 30 yards, I hit some chop and slid out. I recovered, but didn’t have enough time to finish passing him. Connor hugged the finish buoy, cutting off my chance to finish in first.

After lunch, it was time for the skill divisions to race. I raced in the Expert Division against my brother, Osamu Kubota, and Diane Takemoto. The wind had picked up a little bit more like it usually does in the afternoon here on Maui. I had raced against Osamu before and I knew that I’d have to do my best to beat him. I let Connor know that he’d be on his own for the rest of the heats.

The starts were a bit trickier than they usually are because of the way the heats were structured. Expert would run a heat first. Then Semi-Pro. Then Pro. After the last Pro racer crossed the finish line, there were 4 minutes until the start of the next race. That left enough time for everyone to get back up to the start boat. The postponement flag was up during those 4 minutes. It took a couple tries for me to get the hang of the new timing and it looked like everyone else was having trouble adapting too. As a result, all of the Expert division starts were off by a little.

Osamu and I made most of our jibes and were close through all of the heats. I managed to win all of the heats, which I accredit to my morning races being less tiring. Osamu almost had the final heat when I ate it on the last outside jibe. He came blazing around the buoy and I thought for sure he would win. Luckily for me, he caught an edge and sunk his sail which gave me enough time to get my sail up.

Diane and Connor both did well. I don’t think Diane blew any jibes, but she just wasn’t able to keep up with Osamu and me because we had bigger sails. Connor was obviously pretty tired from the morning heats and the increasing wind didn’t help. Diane finished in 3rd ahead of Connor. All in all, it was a really fun and exciting race and I’m looking forward to the next race on June 15th!

Results can be found at https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http://www.mauiraceseries.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Da-Kine-2013.xlsx&hl&chrome=true

 

 

Report from the trenches- SF Classic & Ultra Nectar Challenge

They say- if you’ve got a secret to keep from sailors- put it in the sailing instructions as no one reads them anyway!
That was certainly the case for Sunday’s long distance race of the San Francisco Classic hosted by the St. Francis Yacht Club where the top 4 leading kite boards rounded mark 3 of 14 in the wrong direction despite charging down the slalom course to Berkeley in just over 1 hour.

36 kite and formula windsurfing boards started the race but only 19 finished!

Its the details that count and veteran waterman, Chip Wasson, the only sailor to win the race on both a windsurfer and a kite board made sure he crossed his t’s, dotted his i’s and rounded the marks in the right direction and finished the race in 108:41

Saturday’s long distance race is actually 2 races rolled into 1 and one of my favorite races of the year. Ive done it about a dozen times, abandoned once after breaking down and even won the 2 races back in 2009. Its a 40 mile + grueling long distance race open to kites and boards that takes every ounce to finish.

The first part of the race is the San Francisco Classic which takes sailors on a full tour of the Bay with 2 triangles around the red nun outside the golden gate bridge from Crissy field, then a slalom course across the Bay on beam/broad reaches from Anita Rock to Harding Rock to Blossom Rock to Blunt to R4 buoy to R2 buoy to the top of the Berkeley pier, to Olympic circle X buoy and back to the bottom of the Berkeley pier. Crossing the finish line starts the 2nd half of the race – the Ultra Nectar Challenge- which brings sailors back upwind on any course they choose to a finish in front of the St. Francis Yacht Club.

Johnny Heineken took the line honors on the return trip winning the Ultra Nectar Challenge in a time of 43:26

Full story & photos @ www.stevebodner.blogspot.com

Lake Isabella Speed Week

Eva Hollmann “The Board Lady” just wrapped up the Lake Isabella Speed Week, a great week of gps speed sailing as Lake Isabella in California.  With strong wind and flat water, personal speed records were broken over and over!  The Lake Isabella Speed Quest for the top speed of the summer continues and Speed Week will be back again next year!

First Annual Lake Isabella Speed Week complete results (all speeds are Corrected 2s max knots)

  • Overall Youngest competitor: Loikim Heppell, 8, 3.2kn
  • 0-19 F Maelie Heppell 6.2kn
  • 0-19 M Medrick Heppell 9.5kn
  • 20-39 M first place Denis Savelyev 37.390kn
  • 20-39 M second place Dan Cole 35.112kn
  • 40-49 F Jolene Gauthier 18.50kn
  • 40-59 M first place Boris Vujasinovic 38.780kn
  • 40-59 M second place Jarek Chojnacki 36.350kn
  • 60+ M first place Cliff Hauser 31.607kn
  • 60+ M second place David Goehring 30.754kn
  •  60+ F Eva Hollmann 30.216kn
  • Vintage Class Danny Wood 24.5kn
  • Heavyweight Brian Lynch 28.33kn
  • Novice Matt Higgins 21.442kn

by age class

  • 0-19 F  1. Maelie Heppell 6.2kn
  • 0-19 M  1. Medrick Heppell 9.5kn
  • 20-39 M 1. Denis Savelyev 37.390kn
  • 2. Dan Cole 35.112kn
  • 3. Phillip Jahn 30.539kn
  • 4. Matt Stinemetz 26.513kn
  • 40-49 F  1. Jolene Gauthier 18.50kn
  • 40-59 M 1. Boris Vujasinovic 38.780kn
  • 2. Jareck Chojnacki 36.350kn
  • 3. Olivier Corvez 32.964kn
  • 4. John Spier 32.441kn
  • 5. Bill Steinbeck 31.992kn
  • 6. Dan Eustaquin 31.221kn
  • 7. Martin Heppell 27.70kn
  • 8. Mark Pighini 23.70kn
  • 9. Gary Rugar 21.52kn
  • 10 Fred Scarberry 20.775kn
  • 60+ F  1. Eva Hollmann 30.216kn
  • 60+ M 1. Cliff Hauser 31.607kn
  • 2. David Goehring 30.754kn
  • 3. Larry Caulkett 29.933kn
  • 4. Mike McGroarty 24.987kn

2013 Nationals in Los Angeles

It’s just over 4 months until the 2013 US Windsurfing Nationals Championships in Los Angeles, CA.  Hosted by the Cabrillo Beach Yacht Club and organized by a dedicated group of Southern California windsurfers, this event is sure to be fantastic!

Tons of information is up on the event website at www.2013windsurfingnationals.com so you can start planning your trip.  Bring the whole family to see the sites in L.A., windsurf at Cabrillo Beach and compete at Nationals – all in one trip!  There will be Formula class racing as well as the possibility of having a variety of one-design classes (Kona, RS:One, Techno, etc) and a raceboard class depending on the number of registrants.  There will also be Slalom racing and a Freestyle competition. 

The organizers and th CBYC have gone above and beyond to make sure that this is a Nationals for everyone.  There are even a number of camping spots and motorhome parking spots available at the yacht club.  If you ever wanted to visit L.A. – this is your chance.  So make your plans now, register for the event and we’ll see you there!

Ronstan Bridge to Bridge race- San Francisco, Ca

I tried to run the course a few days earlier in the week and develop a strategy based on the winds and tides along the city front and in the southern shipping channel. My goal was to stay in the breeze, gybe early if needed to and stay upright at all cost in the voodoo chop. Max ebb was a 4:54 with a 3.65k outgoing tide

I was becoming comfortable with my custom double chicken strap on the starboard 167 formula board through the disorganized chaos of chop and swell on the course.
This years starboard goes especially well off the breeze and Ive learned that it doesn’t need a big fin at all to stay powered.
My cut down 64cm kashy fin made the ride tolerable and even somewhat enjoyable.
The last piece of my quiver was the avanti 10.0 sail.
Despite being a light wind slalom sail- the sail blazes downwind.
Its my go to sail for sailing in most any condition on formula in the SF Bay.

68 other high performance sailing craft joined the fun for a 5:30 start.
Rumor had it 2 Ac 45′s were going to race plus l’hydropture- an amazing experiment in fluid hydrodynamics and all out sailing power. To give you an idea of what the hydropture is capable of- take the record they broke earlier in the week practicing speed runs on the SF Bay.

In winds just above 20 knots, the boat reached 44.5 knots driven by skipper Alain Thébault and with the CEO of America’s Cup team Artemis Racing, Paul Cayard, aboard. That’s more than 20 percent faster than even the bay’s high speed ferries (which run at 36 knots). In heavy wind the boat has a top end potential of 61 knots (more than 70 mph.)

I tried lining up with her earlier in the week and got spat out like a water melon seed in the turbulence of wind and water wake as they passed me like I was standing still.

During the line up during the pre start- it became obvious the boat wasn’t in a safe position with all the other kites and formula boards jetting in every direction. The took the wise move and started 5 min early for the safety of everyone around. No sight of the Ac45′s :/

That however still left the Aussie 18 skiffs and kite boarders to content with as well as a handful of other foiling trimaran powered kites, extreme 40 catamarans, and what not’s on the starting line.

The start was postponed as we waited for in inbound tug and an outbound freight to clear the starting area. The start line was set between the red nun buoy west of the south tower and a start boat set just north of mid span. The line was broken up into 3rds with the kite and formula boards starting in the most northern section of the line.

I knew there would be a mid line sag with the ebb and the fact the 2 mid boat lines were not sighting the line. I had Johnny Heineken just below me as we both squirted out from the pack 5 seconds early  and got a good jump on the pack at the start. I’ve sailed enough against Heineken that I know I can trap him, at least temporarily, by sailing beneath him and limiting his kite but I wasnt looking for any battles. I was just looking to go as fast as I could downwind 7.5 miles to the finish line set beneath the eastern most span of the Bay Bridge. Besides Ive given up on trying to beat the kites downwind while powered. They can go super deep. The only chance is when it lightens up and the formula board is back in the game again.


I continued on starboard tack off the line till around the St.FYC where I gybed back and could tell the top few kites had much deeper angles and I crossed just in front of the first skiff and held a good lead on the rest of the windsurfers. The pressure was starting to drop in the middle of the Bay so I gybed back and had a nice line just above Alcatraz.  There was a lot of disorganized chop and I was going between the chicken and the double chicken strap as the pressure went from 14-22k.
The tug that delayed our start was now bearing directly towards the finish line with the top few kites weaving around it. I choose to stay north where the pressure was as I didn’t want to get trapped on the south side of the tug where the city front winds could be lighter as we turned the corner towards the Bay bridge.

The move paid off as I was still in the hunt in the top 10. Gomes went down hard just in front of me as he dipped his edge of his kite in the water while trying to stay alive on his slalom style kiteboard.
A ton of different strategies on what works best on a strictly downwind course.
Sylvester used his 9.0 and 61cm fin for maximum efficiency.
Heineken, who was using a course board, 13m Ozone edge kite but smaller fins had walked away at this point and was nearing the finish line. I was making some gain on kiter, Adam Koch on his course board in the lighter stuff but one or two puffs carried him 100m deeper and out of reach. Nearing the finish the top skiff just crossed in front of me but I had better speed bearing away for the finish.
It was going to be really close.
We were overlapped at the finish with the skiff finishing at the pin and and myself at the boat end.
I looked around and was happily surprised I was able to get all the other windsurfers and about 90 seconds back from the winner.
With the kites taking the top 7 positions, the first skiff just edging me out, I sat in 9th overall.
Johnny Heineken a new course record with a time of 14 minutes and 14 seconds blazing deeper and faster than anything else on the course.

Steve Sylvester was the 2nd windsurfer about a min back from me with Eric Christianson following close behind.
You can always count on the St.FYC to throw a good party and awards after the final competitors are picked up, boards put away and sails rolled up.

Johnny’s secret- go fast and don’t look back!

Steve
USA-4

 

results

Past winners:
1998- McKee Brothers 49′er 27′-18″
1999- Bill Wier- windsurfer 25′-20″
2000- Vlad Moroz- windsurfer 21′-20″
2001- Rob Hartman- windsurfer 20′-20″
2002-Chip Wasson- kiteboarder 18′-04″
2003- Micah Buzianis -windsurfer 16′-23″
2004- Seth Besse -windsurfer 17′-10″
2005- Anthony Chazez- kitrboarder 17′-54″
2006- Jeff Kafka -kiteboarder 20′-28″
2007- Chip Wasson- kiteboarder 16′-30″
2008- Howard Hamlin- Aussie18 skiff 22′-25″
2009-John Winnning Ausie 18 skiff 19′-46″
2010- Michael C -Aussie 18 skiff 19′-44″
2011- Bernie Lake -kiteboarder (16′-15″)
2012-  Johnny Heineken -kiteboarder 14′-14″

 

Windsurfing in Waves and on Lakes in August

The Pacasmayo Classic wave event (the Peru stop on the AWT) and the Kona North American Championships in Minnesota both took place the last weekend of August.  Two very different disciplines of windsurfing in two very different locations – but the same fun and windsurfing stoke at both!

Kona North Americans in MN

The Kona North American’s were held on Lake Waconia, just outside of Minneapolis, MN.  Kona is a one-design class with everyone racing on the Kona One board and the one-design sail for their weight class (bigger sails for bigger folks).  The one-design concept along with the no pumping rule in the Kona class makes for tight, close racing.  With 50 people on the start line, the mark roundings were crowded and exciting!  Joachim Larsson and his daughter Kajsa from Sweden took first and second place overall, Arden Anderson, Steve Johnson and Adam Anderson rounded out the top five.  For more information on the Kona class check out www.konaone.com  The results broken down by class are as follows:

Women: 1st Kajsa Larsson, 2nd Karen Marriott, 3rd Jamie Keltz
Lightweight (7.4m sail): 1st Joe Marotti, 2nd Bruce Matlack, 3rd Jeff Adamski
Midweight (8.2m sail): 1st Joachim Larsson, 2nd Arden Anderson, 3rd Peter Hill
Heavyweight (9.0m sail): 1st Steve Johnson, Adam Anderson, Rob Evans
Super Heavyweight (9.8m sail): 1st Steve Calloway, 2nd Paul Matousek

Pacasmayo Classic

The Pacasmayo Classic was a departure for the American Windsurfing Tour crew – travelling all the way to Peru!  Camille Juban took first place, Tatiana Howard won the women’s and Fabrice Beaux won the master’s.  More stories, pictures and videos can be found at www.americanwindsurfingtour.com

Techno 293 Nationals & Kona New England Champs

Maximo Nores from Miami racing on the Techno 293

Forty-two windsurfers from as far as Mexico, Canada, California, and Florida attended the Techno 293 National and the Kona One Design New England Championships at Vineyard Haven Yacht Club August 1 & 2.  The Techno 293s were part of US Sailing’s Junior Olympic Festival.

 The Florida sailors proved tough to beat in the light winds, taking the top three places overall in the Technos and first in the U17, U15, and U13 age groups.  Five of the top sailors were traveling on to represent USA and Mexico at the Techno 293 World Championships in Medemblik, Holland where more than 350 kids, age 16 and younger, are racing in August.

 Jonathan Rudich won the hotly contested U17 Class and first overall with Olivia Mew (Canada) taking the U19, Geronimo Nores winning the U15, and younger brother Manu Nores taking the U13 age groups.  Emily King was the cream of the Silver Fleet in Techno 293s and will be moving to Gold Fleet in future events.  Nevin Sayre edged out 2012 ISAF Youth Worlds Representative, Margot Samson, in the twenty-two board Kona One Design Class for adults.

Kona Results

Techno 293 results